Geochemical Modelling of Igneous Processes – Principles and Recipes in R language*

Over the past few decades, igneous petrology has gained great power because geochemical modeling can now be used to test geological hypotheses. Technological advances have led to an exponential increase in high-quality geochemical data for igneous rocks and minerals, which is being used to decipher processes in the Earth’s crust and upper mantle. Particularly powerful have been the use of trace elements and radiogenic isotopes. The abundant geochemical data on rocks has been supported by experimental studies, particularly on the behaviour of trace elements, such that we now have a rich database of well-­determined mineral–melt partition coefficients which are used in much of the modelling. Of course, our models are just that: geochemical modelling does not always have the ability to produce a unique solution to a geological problem. Nevertheless, modelling offers a powerful way by which to place limits on a range of possible geological processes.

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Global Volcanic Hazards and Risk

Major environmental challenges affecting human communities require geoscientists who are not only scientifically and technically trained but who recognize their broader commitment to society. With 800 million people at risk from volcanic activity around the world, and populations ever increasing, volcanologists are embracing a more integrative applied approach, which is necessary to understand the human dimensions of volcanic activity. This now extends beyond the few volcano observatories and government agencies previously tasked with this charge to include the academic community. The edited volume Global Volcanic Hazards and Risk presents a state-of-the-art assessment of the preparedness of the global scientific community and government agencies to manage large-scale volcanic hazards and risks. The book also highlights the broad collaboration that exists in the volcanological and associated communities, with over 130 scientists from 86 institutions in nearly 50 countries worldwide contributing to this publication.

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Atlas of Meteorites

The Atlas of Meteorites, by M. Grady, G. Pratesi, and V. Moggi Cecchi, is a beautifully illustrated volume that encompasses the detailed mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of all of the major meteorite groups currently known. Recognizing the importance of textural information—as revealed by optical microscopy—the authors’ stated aim was to provide a textbook akin to An Atlas of Rock-Forming Minerals in Thin Section by W. S. MacKenzie and C. Guilford (1980; Longmans), in the hopes that it will do for meteorites what MacKenzie and Guilford did for understanding the petrology of rocks from Earth.

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