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Ophiolites


Elements - April 2014

 

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Earth Sciences for Cultural Heritage

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February 2016 – Volume 12, Number 1
Earth Sciences for Cultural Heritage

GUEST EDITORS
• Gilberto Artioli and Simona Quartieri

PRINCIPAL EDITORS
• Gordon E. Brown Jr. Stanford University
• Bernard J. Wood University of Oxford
• Friedhelm von Blanckenburg GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam

Table of contents
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GeoScienceWorld Participating Publisher

2014 impact factor = 4.463

ABOUT THIS ISSUE

This issue of Elements celebrates the diverse contributions that the Earth sciences have made to characterizing, interpreting, conserving, and valorizing cultural heritage. As demonstrated in these articles, Earth scientists possess a profound perception of the complexity of natural materials, they have the necessary knowledge of the ancient and recent geological and physicochemical processes acting on natural materials and on the artifacts produced by human activities, and they employ techniques essential for the investigation of our common heritage. Earth scientists greatly contribute towards a better understanding and preservation of our past.

In press: February 1, 2016

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IN PREPARATION

Volume 12, Number 2 (April)The Enigmatic Relationship between Silicic Plutonic and Volcanic Rocks
GUEST EDITORS: Craig C. Lundstrom and Allen F. Glazner

The relationship between silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks has long puzzled geologists. Although the compositional evolution for volcanic and plutonic rock suites are virtually identical, there is much debate whether rhyolites form as melt extracted from granite plutons or whether the two rock types reflect wholly separate origins. This issue discusses the broad set of observations from petrology, geochronology, thermal modeling, geophysical techniques, and geochemistry that lead to contradictory interpretations and no simple description for the relationship. Discerning how silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks are connected will affect important Earth science questions such as “how is continental crust formed?” and “can we predict supereruptions?”

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TOPICS IN 2016

  • Earth Sciences for Cultural Heritage (February 2016)
  • Enigmatic Relationship Between Silicic Plutonic and Volcanic Rocks (April 2016)
  • Cosmic Dust (June 2016)
  • Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste (August 2016)
  • Studying the Earth using LA-ICPMS (October 2016)
  • Origins of Life: Transition from Geochemistry to Bio(geo)chemistry (December 2016)

A publication of the Mineralogical Society of America, the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, the Geochemical Society, the Mineralogical Association of Canada,  The Clay Minerals Society, the International Association of GeoChemistry, the European Association of Geochemistry, the Société Française de Minéralogie et de Cristallographie, the Association of Applied Geochemists, the Deutsche Mineralogische Gesellschaft, the International Association of Geoanalysts, the Società Italiana di Mineralogia e Petrologia, the Polskie Towarzystwo Mineralogiczne (Mineralogical Society of Poland), the Sociedad Española de Mineralogía (Spanish Mineralogical Society), the Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology,  The Meteoritical Society, and the Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences.

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